Catalyst Monthly. Andy Stanley and One Point Preaching

If you work in church ministry and you don't get the Catalyst Monthly then all I can say is, "You are missing out!" Each month you get helpful and insightful short articles written by some of today's most innovative and well-known pastors and leaders delivered right to your inbox.

Here are some highlights from Andy Stanley's latest article: Power in the Punch Line.
What could most preachers do to make their sermons more powerful?
Teach less material at greater depth. Less is more. Instead of leaving listeners with a list of five things to remember-which they won't-plant one powerful thought. Most communicators make the same mistake: they have too much stuff. They miss their moment.

Why do preachers "miss their moment?"
Preachers prepare with this fear: Am I going to be able to fill the time? The audience never worries about that. But every preacher sits down and thinks, Here's this great idea, but I have to fill 35 minutes.

I say to the preachers I mentor, "You've got to get that fear out of your mind, because it will drive you to over-prepare. It will drive you to have four points when you should have just one."

When you're preparing, how do you recognize that punch line?
I look for it. As I study I ask myself, "So what? What's the point? What's the takeaway?"


When I build a sermon, I clear away everything, no matter how good it is, that adds or distracts from that one point. Then I crescendo to it. Preparation isn't about finding a way to divulge everything I know, but about asking myself, "What's the thing, Andy? Just say the one thing, and then stop your mouth from moving.
For those of you who don't preach but who listen to it each week...
- How long do you thing a pastor should speak?
- Do you like multiple point sermons or would you prefer just one point?
- Do you take any notes during a message to remember it by?
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

5 Reasons I Won't Let My Kids Wear Clothes with Skulls on Them

How Stephanie and I Celebrated 15 Years of Marriage

Lessons from Mt Everest