removing potential frustrations for our people

At the restaurant I manage we have had a broken ice machine for the last week. Part of the time it has made ice sporadically, but recently it just started spitting water all over the floor and making a huge mess. So I am stuck giving people ice that we have had to buy at the grocery store.

What has made the situation particularly difficult is that the guy who was managing before me has been trying to get the situation straightened out with the ice machine maintenance guys for quite some time. All of which leaves me in limbo looking like someone who can't get stuff fixed and it leaves many customers annoyed at best, if not upset.

Why am I writing this? Because I believe that first impressions matter - particularly in the church. I want people to have a good experience at my store, but I especially want people to have a good experience when they attend a church service. I don't care how good the pastor is, if your facility looks bad and nothing works, people aren't sticking around to hear him.

Think through everything at your church. Does it look good? Does it work? Is it easy to use? Is it easy to find your way around the facility to the different rooms and places people need to get to?

What frustrations, both spoken and unspoken, obvious and not so obvious, conscious and sub-conscious, are people faced with when they attend your church?

It might be time for me to just step in and get the ice machine fixed myself, even if it costs me more money. Bad experiences may be costing me even more in future business. How about you? Where do you need to step up and make sure that it gets done right?
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