God Owes Me Nothing

Last night I listened to a couple of extremely powerful messages by Matt Chandler. He is going through a series on the cross and he sets up the series with a few weeks discussing the glory of God and the passion of God for his name. I can't remember which message it was, but in one of the first two Chandler states emphatically that "God owes you nothing!" I have been internally rocked by that phrase all day.

I would never say that God owes me something out loud, but I sure live like it. Too much the unsaid driving force in my live is the belief that God owes me financial security, good health, a nice home, easy parenting, healthy and safe children, success in my business and ministry endeavors.

Why does he owe me these things? Because I said a prayer to ask him into my heart. Honestly, that is what it boils down to at the most basic level. Because I am a Christian I think that God is supposed to make my life nice and that all my needs will be met. I live like God is supposed to make much of me instead of me making much of him in all circumstances. And to his praise I am learning that this is totally false.

God owes me nothing. Everything that I have is a gift of his grace; my very faith is a gift. There is nothing that I can bring to God that would make him indebted to me. Because without his grace, there is nothing purely good that I can bring to a holy God such as he. Even my best intentions are marked with sin.

That is just the truth of the sinful nature that makes its home in my soul. Where there is a kind word from my mouth, there is manipulation in my mind. Where there is an act of service, there is a desire to be recognized and seen. Where there is a compliment accepted from another, there is false humility and a sense of entitlement. Where there is preaching and teaching, there is arrogance and pride.

Thank God for the graces of God!
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