Gospel Preaching and Being Eaten by Lions

Great ideas in the following quotes that don't fit into many modern Christian paradigms regarding God's interaction with, and blessing on, his people.
Pastor Doug Wilson once quipped that “a great reformation and revival . . . will happen the same way the early Christians conquered Rome. Their program of conquest consisted largely of two elements—gospel preaching and being eaten by lions—a strategy that has not yet captured the imagination of the contemporary church.” 
Somehow the myth has gotten around that if something is difficult or if we encounter opposition, it must not be God’s will. God’s will, we are wrongly told, involves blessing. Yet we fail to accept that suffering for Jesus is a blessing.
HT: Going Out of Business for Jesus

There are lots of lions in the world today.  Lions who want to eat Christians over social issues, marital issues, lifestyle choices, fundamental beliefs, conservative ideas, modern thinking, and a whole host of other ideas.  Sadly many Christians (pastors and churches included) back down from societal lions for fear of being eaten.  It shouldn't be this way though.  In the Book of Daniel Jesus shut the mouth of the lions.  They lions wanted to kill Daniel because of his faithfulness to God, but it was precisely because of his faithfulness to God that Daniel couldn't be .

A life free of opposition is a life free of commitment to Christ.  Faith makes some waves.  When ever you swim against the current this is the case.  There will be lions who attack fiercely God's elect in the world.  Sometimes the lions will consume the temporal man, but the eternal spirit of a man will never be consumed, and one day God will crush the head of Satan once and for all.  The greatest lion, the Lion of Judah, Aslan, will roar with a sound so deafening that the little lions of the world will hide their tales in shame.
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